The Propagandas in An Illustrated History of Britain An Illustrated History of Britain is a big example of British propaganda because the author just mentions about the goodness of the Britian

The Propagandas in An Illustrated History of Britain
An Illustrated History of Britain is a big example of British propaganda because the author just mentions about the goodness of the Britian. In the book there is almost nothing about the bad sides of the British people. This book is written in the propagandistic style and there are many examples and definitions for this situation for example Kimball Young defines propaganda as ”the more or less deliberately planned and systematic use of symbols, chiefly through suggestion and related psychological techniques, with a view to altering and controlling opinions, idead and values, and ultimately to changing overt actions along predetermined lines. Propaganda maybe open and its purpose avowed, or it may conceal its intention. It always has a setting within a social-cultural framework, without which neither its psychological not its cultural features can be understood.
DARDANELLES
The Turks first stepped into Anatolia. Following period, to maintain their presence in this region has adopted a strategy of targeting the Dardanelles. At one point the security strategy has been one of the cornerstones. For centuries an important element of the defense of the Dardanelles has been an indispensable especially for housing navy and sailors. Gallipoli campaign comes to mind first naval victory matters March 18 and from April 25 are land battles on the Gallipoli peninsula. There are lots of operative and tactical operations, including maritime transport logistics first victory strategy behind the scenes. This operative and tactical success in all the operations carried out investigations to assess the level will remain incomplete.
Dardanelles, before the victory it was seen as a dream that the Turks will never win. Dardanelles is the war of honor, faith and freedom against imperialism and colonialism. For these reasons Dardanelles is one of the epics written by the Turkish Nation in golden letters. Before the war, it was expected that the entente states will easily win in Çanakkale. The whole world thought that the struggle will take place on unequal conditions. English and French navy on one side; all kinds of weapons and equipment and on the other side the Turks, were defeated in the Balkan Wars, tired and possessed and the weapons manufactured during Abdülhamid time in the previous century. British soldiers and Captain Kitchener were so confident that they rejected the support of Prime Minister Churchill’s proposal.
The British saw Dardanelles as a place that will make them so famous on the world with their victory but they were wrong. Because it was not easy to broke the defenses of the Çanakkale. The attempt of go in the straits was a huge problem for the entente states because there were mines in the sea that is planted by the Turks. The Turks vanquished the entente states although there were really bad situations for the Turks for example hunger in the army, lack of weapons.
THE BOMBING OF DRESDEN
The sequence leading up to the bombing of Dresden became first linked in July 1944 when British Prime Minister Winston Churchill commented that: “The time might well come in the not too distant future when an all-out attack by every means at our disposal on German civilian morale might be decisive.”5 That time came in early 1945, when the Anglo-American armies were on the threshold into Germany. The journey had not been easy. Taken aback by a series of impressive but failed German counter-attacks in late 1944-45, allied commanders feared that enemy resistance would stiffen in the fight for Germany. Their fears prompted an over-riding importance to end the war as soon as possible.
Allied bomber commanders saw this as a final opportunity to prove one of the air arm’s oldest of maxims: that the demoralization of people by bombing would induce the enemy Government to sue for peace, thus obviating the need for a ground campaign. 6 So especially vehement was the British belief in this that the Royal Air Force (RAF) adopted the indiscriminate bombing of cities or “Area Bombing” as it was known, as the cornerstone of its offensive air tactics during the war. Many innocents died of phosphor bombs. There is a part in the book and it says ”the cruelty of the Nazis” and now it is clear that British people are as cruel as Nazis.