As the war continued

As the war continued, the risk for suicide among service members steadily increased. The majority of group who were at a higher risk and twice as likely to commit suicide were males between the ages of 17-26. This has been due to increased deployment rotations as well as ground combat.
“An estimated 1 in 5 soldiers returning home suffers from post-traumatic stress disorders.” (Eugene, 2011). https://search-proquest-com.prx-keiser.lirn.net/docview/894266813/4019909A83AF41C4PQ/10?accountid=35796 Many members experience symptoms such as numbness, irritability, depression, difficulties in relationships, nightmares, flashbacks, difficulty sleeping, and guilt at surviving after the war. The Veterans Health Administration originally classified these members with only having depression or other mood disorders such as anxiety, or bipolar.
In 2008, the DoD and VHA started to recognize PTSD and its’ possible relation to the increase in suicides with our active duty and veterans. In 2010, the Veterans Administration started tracking two chronic diseases or conditions in a patient and its’ relation to suicide among our military members.