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1. An Open Society Should Have Open Borders.
Politicians, journalists and activists of every ideology refer to the U.S. immigration system as “broken.” If what we’re doing doesn’t work, why not try something different?
Capital and goods are exchanged across borders due to the North American Free Trade Agreement; it made it easier for business owners to invest in Mexico for goods to flow freely across the U.S.-Mexico border. However, repercussions of this put millions of Mexicans out of work and weren’t permitted to cross the border in search of jobs created here.The United States can learn from Europe and how well its countries harmonize. Europe opened many of its bordersAs Bill Hing points out, when the European Union was created, effectively allowing the free movement of EU citizens across the common market’s borders, a funny thing happened. Countries once known for their high output of immigrants, like Spain, Portugal and Ireland, became immigrant-receiving countries — a pattern that held until the worldwide economic crisis in 2007. Neither party can boast a record of fiscal responsibility when it comes to the border. The U.S. spends more on border enforcement than on all other federal law enforcement agencies combined. Americans are proud of their country’s history of harboring Irish families fleeing famine in the late 19th century, as well as Jewish refugees from World War II. Why not refugees from Mexico and Central America?

2. The Marine Mammal Protection Act Should Include the Expected Treatment of Housed Animals.
In 1961, the first orca capture occurred in the North Eastern Pacific. A wild capture crew wrangled the seventeen-foot orca to a tank at the Marineland aquarium in Los Angeles. The aquarium coordinators named her Wanda and expected a spike in popularity to see the first orca in captivity. Due to her stress and anxiety of the capture and placement into a small, housing tank, she repeatedly crashed into the walls and died the following day. Since then, there have been several incidents on record where killer whales have killed themselves or other orcas, attacked or killed their trainer, or have killed. Some suggest that these tragedies reflect the stresses that these creatures experience as a result of entertainment-based captivity.
Currently, there are no laws that prohibit or restrict the type of housing tank for orca whales in captivity. Our organization strives to tighten the accessibility that aquarium coordinators possess.
The Marine Mammal Proctetion Act enforces that aquarium coordinators must get a permit to take a marine mammal from the wild, such as an orca. However, Permits are easily attained for scientific research, public enteirtainment, or to recover an injured animal.
The United States has not been issued a permit allowing the capture of a wild orca since 1989, other nations perform hunts in order to capture orcas for display. The United States relies instead on maintaining its captive whale population through breeding programs of whales already living in captivity. While there is no law prohibiting the display of orcas, there are laws that govern those facilities that house them. The primary laws governing the facilities housing orca whales are the Animal Welfare Act and the Marine Mammal Protection Act. The Animal Welfare Act establishes standards and specifications that the facility must follow and adhere to in order to house an orca whale in captivity. It establishes the standard of care required when handling, housing, or transporting orca whales and other marine mammals.
The standards are difficult to enforce as there are a small number of inspectors to inspect all of the facilities in the nation.

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3. Is the Death Penalty an Acceptable Punishment?
Fear of death discourages people from committing crimes. If capital punishment were carried out more it would prove to be the crime preventative it was partly intended to be. Most criminals would think twice before committing murder if they knew their own lives were at stake.
Capital punishment is an intolerable denial of civil liberties and is inconsistent with the fundamental values of our democratic system. The death penalty is uncivilized in theory and unfair and inequitable in practice.The death penalty is a waste of taxpayer funds and has no public safety benefit. The vast majority of law enforcement professionals surveyed agree that capital punishment does not deter violent crime; a survey of police chiefs nationwide found they rank the death penalty lowest among ways to reduce violent crime. They ranked increasing the number of police officers, reducing drug abuse, and creating a better economy with more jobs higher than the death penalty as the best ways to reduce violence. The FBI has found the states with the death penalty have the highest murder rates.